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Crimean news ¹31

 (Mass Media survey for 8-13 November 1999)

Yesterday’s Rallies

“Wild Dances” Near the Memorable Stone

A Meeting with Compatriots

Medical Center for the Deported

The Blue Fuel has Reached Houses

Getting a Wished-for Result Really Takes Great Effort

The Disabled in the Self-buildings* Need Rescue Also

Regrets, Many Regrets

 

Politics

 

Yesterday’s Rallies

November 7th--the anniversary of the October Revolution--is not officially considered a holiday. The President’s suggestion to make this day “A Day of Peace” was not supported. Both left and right parties decisively turned down this suggestion. What kind of “Day of Peace” can it be when the revolution seems to be endless and the adherents of the ideas of Lenin and Stalin are eager to restore the USSR, the motherland of October?

Even if the rally lasted for 4 days, there was no official holiday in general. But if we speak about Crimea separately, the holiday is quiet official. The Presidium of the Supreme Counsel and the Ministry Counsel of Autonomous Republic approved Crimea’s congratulations devoted to the 82nd anniversary of the Great October socialist revolution. This document, strange for our time, is interesting in that it contains only one true statement asserting that the October Revolution made a sharp turn in the lives of people who live on one-sixth of our planet. We cannot deny it. It made such a sharp turn that our country is now at the back of the beyond of civilization, and the USSR has gradually died, leaving some “not wasted” natural resources for the so-called construction of communism in the whole world.

Rallies under red flags and portraits of Lenin and Stalin not only expressed people’s longing for the communistic past with unlimited power of the KPSS and “cheap sausage”, but also had a definite aim – the achievement of power, not by using weapons but by using voting-cards. Yes, the pre-election speech sounded quiet loudly at the rally of “Reds”.

“Vl.Vlad, “The Voice of the Crimea”, ¹46(313), 12 November 1999, p.1.”

 

“Wild Dances” Near the Memorable Stone

The memorial stone devoted to the victims of deportation was profaned in Simferopol’s Salgirka Park. People in our country are accustomed to blame Chechnians in any part of the CIS when there is any extraordinary situation. The authorities intentionally point people’s attention to people of the Caucasian nationalities and… the Crimean Tatars. If the representatives of Ichkeriya have arrived in Crimea, it means that the Crimean Tatars are planning something illegal. Not in vain, one of the first leaders of our sunny republic during one of his interviews stated (with an offended voice) that the Crimean Tatars together with the Chechenians conducted warlike dances on 18 May. After this warlike statement it became clear to the whole country that the formation of an enemy image is in progress. And, being angry with the “ungrateful deported nation that was at last allowed to return”, a narrow person is looking for a way to take revenge and express his accumulated anger and aggression. And thus he profanes memorials – silent memorial stones, gravestones and tombstones.

“F.Torsinova, “The Voice of the Crimea”, ¹45 (542), 13 November 1999, p.1.”

 

A Meeting with Compatriots

The Crimean Tatar Mejlis chairman, Mustafa Djemilev, met his compatriots who live in Pervomayskoye district. During a prolonged talk they discussed the problems of the Presidential elections in Ukraine and today’s socio-political problems. The national representatives asked M.Djemilev a number of questions.

“E.Emirsanov, “Kirim”, ¹45(542), 13 November 1999, p.1.”

 

The Social Sphere

 

Medical Center for the Deported

The Public Health Ministry of Ukraine approved of the Crimean experience in the organization of medical treatment for deported nations. The fact that medical treatment for the Crimean Tatars should be made with an account of their national peculiarities and traditions was clear at the beginning of the nineties with the mass return of the deported to the peninsula. But this was only one of the reasons impelling the Public Health Ministry to take its first steps in establishing such a center in Simferopol for the treatment of repatriates. There were also other reasons.  The repatriates, having returned to their motherland, faced an extreme problem of unemployment. The establishment of the center provided many Crimean Tatars with work. But the most important reason for establishing such a center was the necessity of looking after the health of the repatriates. Medical personnel feared outbreaks of infectious diseases such as hepatitis, tuberculosis, diseases of the digestive organs and blood diseases.

The forced migration of the entire nation to new places* with different climates and different living conditions had a negative effect on the health of thousands of people. Two mobile brigades, formed by the Medical Center, regularly visit the places where Crimean Tatars live very compactly. In addition, modern medical equipment, which is at the disposal of every brigade, allows them to conduct high level, complex professional check-ups. 4 thousand people have gone through such a check-up during 6 months of the current year. In total, 18 thousand Crimean Tatars have been treated at the Medical Center during this time.

“DINAU, “The Crimean Times”, ¹210(813), 11 November 1999, p.1.”

Explanations

*Deportation of the Crimean Tatars to the Urals, Central Asia and other regions of the USSR is meant here.

 

The Blue Fuel has Reached Houses

The dwellers of the Bakhchisaray 6th micro district have been waiting for this day for many years. And it has come: these people have natural gas. A natural gas distribution point has been specially designed and constructed, and 2 km of gas main was laid while constructing the gas main. The blue fuel will make people’s lives much easier.

“Valentin Yarovoy, “The Crimean Truth”, 12 November 1999, p.1.”

 

Getting a Wished-for Result Really Takes Great Effort

The completion of the first stage of installing a water main in the village Kamish-Kora, located in Simferopol district, was celebrated a bit earlier than it should have been. In any case, the news that the village dwellers already had water was, frankly speaking, an exaggeration. In reality, the village dwellers are still fetching water from a versta and using bad and muddy roads as a path. 400 lots have been given for individual construction, but people have begun building on only 120 of them. Although the village is close to Simferopol, living conditions “leave room to hope for the best” – no roads, no sewerage, no telephone. Moreover, the houses, which are close to the pond, get flooded during heavy rains.

As the Leader of local Crimean Tatar women’s league, Meva Seitbekirova, states: “During all those nine years when I was fighting for the construction of a water main, none of the leaders were interested in the affairs of poor and suffering people – neither the local authorities nor the Autonomy leadership. At last they have begun doing something – the first stage of the water main is finished. However, the pipes that were laid went out of order on the very first day. “It was the fault of the contract organization” explained specialists. It is a pity that after such long and tiring work we have to suffer because of someone’s negligence. All the media means have informed that there is water, but unfortunately we have not had a drop of it.

Some dwellers have bored wells, but as the sanitarium-epidemic stations have concluded, the water is not fit for drinking. Actually, it is not even fit for washing.

“Lentara Halilova, “The Voice of the Crimea”, ¹46(313),12 November, 1999, p.1.”

Explanation

*Versta – Russian unit of measure, used in the text in the meaning of “from a far place”.

 

The Disabled in the Self-buildings* Need Rescue Also

A Speaker of the Crimean Parliament, speaking about the problems of a program to provide telephones in the houses and flats of disabled persons and World War 2 veterans during 2000-2005, emphasized that for these people, a telephone is not only communication with the world but also rescue, and for that reason we must do everything possible in order to provide these people with telephones (there are 1468 of them). While taking necessary care of poor people we should not forget that there are the same Crimean Tatar disabled persons in self-buildings who need rescue also. Unfortunately, no one even speaks about providing this populated area with telephones. These people have to walk a pretty long way to the nearest phone in order to call an ambulance, but unfortunately, they are not always in time.

“Lentara Halilova, “The Voice of the Crimea”, ¹46(313), 12 November 1999, p.1.”

Explanation

*self-buildings – villages which were built by returning Crimean Tatars in the end of 1980’s and the beginning of the 1990’s, despite the Crimean authority’s strict taboo that prevented the return of the native nation from exile.

 

Culture

 

Regrets, Many Regrets

A meeting of Crimean Tatars with the dwellers of the Kamenka micro district was held in this micro district. The Crimean Tatar writer, Shakir Selim, his assistant, the editor of the literary and historical department of “Yani Dunya” (“New World”) newspaper, poet Yunus Kandim, and writer Riza Hazim took part in the meeting. They spoke out about the catastrophic condition of the native language and the rate oat which people are reading periodical newspapers. These kinds of meetings are planned to be conducted in many regions of Crimea. At the second session of the Kurultay 3, they made a decision to adopt a program, which would support the native language and its practical usage. The Crimean Tatar Literature Counsel has also taken some practical steps to solve this great problem, because Crimean Tatar writers were worried about their native language even when they were in exile. Using any opportunity at every meeting they have discussed the problem of their native language and its development. These meetings were held both in exile and after coming back to the motherland. They also decided that the problem of the supporting and development of the native language should be solved by the whole nation. Writers emphasized the difficult condition of the Crimean Tatar language and made specific suggestions for a way out of this hard condition.

“Y.Beshim, “Yany Dunya”, (“New World”), ¹45(499), 13 November 1999, p.8.”